The Electric Notebook

It fell out of my brain onto the keyboard, and that's all I have to say.

759 notes

marthajefferson:

In A New Hope, Luke’s all-white clothes make a stark contrast with Vader’s all-black ensemble hearkening back to the serial westerns of the 1940s and 1950s, in which the goods wore white and the bads, black. Luke’s outfits continue to emphasize his characterization in this way throughout the trilogy. In The Empire Strikes Back, when he journeys to meet Yoda or to rescue his friends on Bespin, his fatigues are a light gray, showing that he has traveled from the innocent idealism of his youth and has placed himself in peril of straying to the Dark Side. By the time we get to Return of the Jedi, he has adopted an all-black wardrobe, not meaning he has gone over to the Dark Side, but instead, recalling a priest or monk’s garb, and linking him visually to his father, with whose fate he is so deeply connected with.

the “from white to gray to black” evolution

(via starwarsgroup)

Filed under star wars luke skywalker

162 notes

earthstory:



Fossil bees!This pair of images shows, on top, a modern-day leafcutter bee from the species Megachile rotundata and a very cool fossil find from the LaBrea Tar Pits.The bees come from a pair of full nests exhumed from a part of the tar pits; the same location has produced bones from animals 23,000 to 40,000 years old, and carbon-14 dating of the material in the nests gives the same age, so these bees are about that old. Many interesting specimens are preserved in the nests and have been found by scientists exhuming material from the tar pits, including the leafy walls of the nests themselves, adults, and pupae like this one.The bees are from species that are widespread in the United States, but the presence of these bees at this site actually helps constrain how their distributions have changed during the big climate shifts that happened since the nests were made. The bees today have expanded ranges at higher elevations than is suggested by these fossil finds, indicating that as the climate of the area warmed, the bees moved uphill to follow similar temperature levels.-JBBLozImage credit:Image credit: PLOS One (Open access journal):http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi/10.1371/journal.pone.0094724

earthstory:

Fossil bees!

This pair of images shows, on top, a modern-day leafcutter bee from the species Megachile rotundata and a very cool fossil find from the LaBrea Tar Pits.

The bees come from a pair of full nests exhumed from a part of the tar pits; the same location has produced bones from animals 23,000 to 40,000 years old, and carbon-14 dating of the material in the nests gives the same age, so these bees are about that old. Many interesting specimens are preserved in the nests and have been found by scientists exhuming material from the tar pits, including the leafy walls of the nests themselves, adults, and pupae like this one.

The bees are from species that are widespread in the United States, but the presence of these bees at this site actually helps constrain how their distributions have changed during the big climate shifts that happened since the nests were made. The bees today have expanded ranges at higher elevations than is suggested by these fossil finds, indicating that as the climate of the area warmed, the bees moved uphill to follow similar temperature levels.

-JBB

Loz

Image credit:

Image credit: PLOS One (Open access journal):
http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi/10.1371/journal.pone.0094724

(via scienceyoucanlove)

Filed under science bees